Online Editorials Archive

Ongoing UK Research Problems (10) – Losing EU Funding

Red(November 28th, 2017) Following the result of the 2016 ‘Brexit’ referendum, the UK government has resolved to be the first nation ever to withdraw from the European Union. In the absence of any previous example nor any clear plan for how the UK will achieve its divorce, uncertainty reigns. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(November 24th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Sounds in the Forest. more

Ongoing UK Research Problems (9) – Brexit Uncertainties

Red(November 23rd, 2017) Following the result of the 2016 Brexit referendum, the UK government has resolved to be the first nation ever to withdraw from the European Union. In the absence of any previous example nor any clear plan for how the UK will achieve its divorce, uncertainty reigns. more

Bio-GPS: A Way to Get Around

Red(November 21st, 2017) Magnetoreception is a fascinating sense but scientists still don't understand how it functions. Currently, three ideas are being tested, amongst others by researchers in Vienna. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(November 17th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of scienc fun. Today: Pop goes science. more

Ninety Nine World Records

Red(November 16th, 2017) What do you think of when you hear about “spiders”? Arachnids, walk on eight legs, make some people scream…, but Italian scientists find they can also teach us important lessons in organismal biology. more

Celebrating Synthetic Biology

Red(November 14th, 2017) We have all heard that synthetic biology can improve our quality of life. But do we really know what it entails? In October, the SynCity Film & Art Festival shed some light on synthetic biology research and raised awareness about its importance. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(November 10th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Creative Zoology. more

Ongoing UK Research Problems (8) – Science Means Business

Red(November 9th, 2017) Independent of Brexit uncertainties, Jeremy Garwood reports on a number of other UK government policy changes and plans that are already changing the UK research labscape. more

Ongoing UK Research Problems (7) – The £6 Billion Science Man

Red(November 7th, 2017) Independent of Brexit uncertainties, Jeremy Garwood reports on a number of other UK government policy changes and plans that are already changing the UK research labscape. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(November 3rd, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: The deadly duck. more

Evidence-Based Travel

Red(November 2nd, 2017) Does being a scientist influence the way you conduct your everyday life? Donald Nicolson say yes - his research work has made him a more skilful traveller. more

Fishing for Outstanding Abilities

Red(October 31st, 2017) Faced with the poor annotation of the chicken genome, molecular biologist Hiroshi Arakawa developed a method to disrupt gene expression via the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, without prior knowledge of target DNA sequences. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(October 27th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Dermatologists in Hollywood. more

United for the Best Science Possible

Red(October 26th, 2017) EU-LIFE recently published a position paper, announcing key prioritities in the upcoming Framework Programme for Research and Innovation, FP9. One of the recommendations concerns the strengthening of basic research. more

Learning to Make Connections

Red(October 24th, 2017) Networking is a well-established branch of professional development that secures growth on the career ladder. A recent study provides evidence that young researchers are less successful in mastering this craft, due to lack of training. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(October 20th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: The truth about lab orders. more

Ongoing UK Research Problems (6) – Divide and Conquer

Red(October 19th, 2017) Independent of Brexit uncertainties, Jeremy Garwood reports on a number of other UK government policy changes and plans that are already changing the UK research labscape. more

Ongoing UK Research Problems (5) – Private Universities

Red(October 17th, 2017) Independent of Brexit uncertainties, Jeremy Garwood reports on a number of other UK government policy changes and plans that are already changing the UK research labscape. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(October 13th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Horoscope for E. coli. more

Bacterial Energy

Red(October 12th, 2017) Fuel cells require platinum to function but this chemical element is scarce and expensive. French researchers replaced it with bacterial enzymes. more

A Solution for Rubbish?

Red(October 10th, 2017) Earlier this year, scientists claimed that a caterpillar is able to digest plastic. But, as another team points out, their analysis is not conclusive. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(October 6th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: An adipose unicorn. more

Wizards of Visualisation

Red(October 5th, 2017) Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson win this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developing cryo-Electron Microscopy. more

Cheesy Award

Red(October 4th, 2017) You don’t like cheese? Why ask? This is actually a scientific question. And because it is one that first makes you laugh and then think, it has been honoured with the infamous Ig Nobel Prize this year. more

The Time Keepers

Red(October 2nd, 2017) The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was jointly awarded to Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(September 29th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: A cloning poem. more

Overcoming Gender Inequality in Science and Beyond

Red(September 28th, 2017) There is an increasing awareness in the UK, and in many other countries, that women are under-represented in senior science positions. The SciSisters initiative tackles these problems directly. more

Counting Sheep in the Academy

Red(September 26th, 2017) Despite suffering from the consequences of a childhood brain injury, Donald Nicolson still made a career in science. Here's his story. more

Run the Experiments (18) - One Last Coffee

Red(September 25th, 2017) Here's a new episode of Lab Times' serialised crime story. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(September 22nd, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of scienc fun. Today: cool chemistry. more

History Revealed

Red(September 21st, 2017) By analysing 10,000-year old DNA, Swedish researchers show when fish colonialised Swedish lakes. more

Connecting Plants and Society

Red(September 19th, 2017) In July, plant scientists from around the world agreed on a new roadmap for plant science and signed the Shenzhen Declaration. more

Run the Experiments (17) - The Confession

Red(September 18th, 2017) Here's a new episode of Lab Times' serialised crime story. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(September 15th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Prize-winning ear research. more

Power of the Mind

Red(September 14th, 2017) Do you want to be more creative? No problem; scientists in Israel say it only needs some mind trickery. more

Belated Revolution

Red(September 12th, 2017) Information Exchange Groups could have revolutionised science communication long ago - if only they hadn't been “strangulated” shortly after birth. What can their deaths teach us about the rising trend of preprinting? more

Run the Experiments (16) - Caught in the Act

Red(September 11th, 2017) Here's a new episode of Lab Times' serialised crime story. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(September 8th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of scienc fun. Today: The taxonomy of plastic plants. more

Clear and Comprehensible

Red(September 7th, 2017) Four neuroscientists from Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm screened 700,000 abstracts and discovered that scientific texts have become harder and harder to understand. more

Toxic Findings

Red(September 5th, 2017) Just a few nanogram per kg body weight can kill a human. Recently, scientists in Sweden and the US discovered a new form of botulinum toxin. more

Run the Experiments (15) - The Visit

Red(September 4th, 2017) Here's a new episode of Lab Times' serialised crime story. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(September 1st, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Portrait of a worm. more

A Good Idea but...

Red(August 31st, 2017) A new initiative is launched to reduce the time spent on manuscript resubmission, peer-review and the transfer to and from preprint servers. more

Excellent Money Supply

Red(August 29th, 2017) Earlier this month, the ERC announced its funding plans for 2018. Besides the familiar grant types, there's a new one. more

Run the Experiments (14) - A Call from Home

Red(August 28th, 2017) Here's a new episode of Lab Times' serialised crime story. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(August 25th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: A praise of flow cytometry. more

New Model Army

Red(August 24th, 2017) Neuroscientists are looking beyond worms, flies and mice to study the evolution and function of the nervous system. more

Simply Stable

Red(August 22nd, 2017) Making stable cell lines is a laborious task. Canadian researchers came up with a new method using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock-in. more

Run the Experiments (13) - Just Like Heaven

Red(August 21st, 2017) Here's a new episode of Lab Times' serialised crime story. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(August 18th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: A happy cancer cell. more

Don’t Blame Open Science for Scooping

Red(August 17th, 2017) Open science is becoming more and more prevalent. Critics, however, think this approach makes it easier to steal somebody else’s ideas. A new study explores how some researchers not only do not fear open science but, in fact, welcome it as a way to fight illegitimate scooping. more

Legislation in the Lab

Red(August 15th, 2017) The multidisciplinary project, ANIMPACT, was established in 2013 to address how legislation, regulating animal research, impacts upon biomedical research in Europe. Now, the first results are in. more

Lab Times Summer Read (8) - “I Really Love Shoes”

Red(August 3rd, 2017) Digging deep into our archive, we found quite a few gems from the past, worth a second read. Here's a 2006 interview with geneticist Leena Peltonen-Palotie (†2010) about population studies in Finland and the European and US science spirit. more

Lab Times Summer Read (7) – Mosquitoes and Limburger Cheese

Red(August 1sth, 2017) Digging deep into our archive, we found quite a few gems from the past, worth a second read. Here's some Incredible Science from the secret archives of the IgNobel committee, from 2006. more

Lab Times Summer Read (6) – “The Heart of Research is Sick”

Red(July 28th, 2017) Digging deep into our archive, we found quite a few gems from the past, worth a second read. Here's a 2011 interview with developmental biologist Peter Lawrence about the 'broken' research system. more

Lab Times Summer Read (5) – Feel a Fish and Make it Happy

Red(July 25th, 2017) Digging deep into our archive, we found quite a few gems from the past, worth a second read. Here's a 2012 Research Letter from our corresponding author, Tocou Peixes, from Portugal. more

Lab Times Summer Read (4) – “We Have to be Prepared”

Red(July 21st, 2017) Digging deep into our archive, we found quite a few gems from the past, worth a second read. Here's a 2009 interview with vaccine researcher Rino Rappuoli about the worldwide swine flu pandemic at that time. more

Lab Times Summer Read (3) – Spitting Hedgehogs

Red(July 18th, 2017) Digging deep into our archive, we found quite a few gems from the past, worth a second read. Here's some Incredible Science from the secret archives of the IgNobel committee, from 2007. more

Lab Times Summer Read (2) - “For Science, Play is Not a Luxury”

Red(July 14th, 2017) Digging deep into our archive, we found quite a few gems from the past, worth a second read. Here's an interview with the inventor of the Southern blot, Edwin Southern, from 2013. more

Lab Times Summer Read (1) – Praying for Dopamine

Red(July 12th, 2017) Digging deep into our archive, we found quite a few gems from the past, worth a second read. Here's a Lab Times classic from 2009, a Research Letter from Denmark by our corresponding author, Tahor Grundtvig. more

On Holiday

Red(July 5th, 2017) Lab Times online will take a break until August. So, enjoy summer but don't forget... more

The Wrong Path

Red(July 4th, 2017) Non-functioning antibodies are a nuisance in every lab. But when two decades of research are based on them, problems are of a much bigger dimension. more

Run the Experiments (12) - Tea Time!

Red(July 3rd, 2017) Here's a new episode of Lab Times' serialised crime story. more


Science Fun of the Week

Red(June 30th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Riot in the Respiratory Tract. more

Ongoing UK Research Problems (4) – Royal Charter No More?

Red(June 29th, 2017) Independent of Brexit uncertainties, Jeremy Garwood reports on a number of other UK government policy changes and plans that are already changing the UK research labscape. more

Ongoing UK Research Problems (3) – Governing Science

Red(June 27th, 2017) Independent of Brexit uncertainties, Jeremy Garwood reports on a number of other UK government policy changes and plans that are already changing the UK research labscape. more

Run the Experiments (11) - The Man with the Yellow Cap

Red(June 26th, 2017) Here's a new episode of Lab Times' serialised crime story. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(June 23rd, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Noninsect Arthropods in Popular Music. more

Playfully Unlocking Molecular Secrets

Red(June 22nd, 2017) Life scientists from Imperial College London helped to develop a new free mobile computer game, which wants to crack one of the hardest problems in biological science – how molecules fit together. more

Cyborgisation of Mankind

Red(June 21st, 2017) Switzerland-based publisher Frontiers awarded its first Frontiers Spotlight Award, honouring an entire research topic – brain augmentation. more

Run the Experiments (10) - An Unusual Meeting

Red(June 19th, 2017) Here's a new episode of Lab Times serialised crime story. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(June 16th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Prokaryote Poetry. more

Fighting Fraud Together

Red(June 15th, 2017) A new European network tackling scientific misconduct was launched in May. Will it be a step forward to academic integrity? more

Popular Poplar on Social Media

Red(June 13th, 2017) Expecting tweets only from birds sitting in trees? A poplar tree at Wageningen University learned to twitter itself – with a little help from the scientists who work with it. more

Run the Experiments (9) - A Serious Loss

Red(June 12th, 2017) Here's a new episode of Lab Times' serialised crime story. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(June 9th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: A precious case from Middle Earth. more

Gold for Protein Scientist

Red(June 8th, 2017) Maya Schuldiner from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel is the recipient of the 2017 EMBO Gold Medal. She receives the award for significantly advancing the understanding of protein synthesis, trafficking and quality control in yeast. more

Run the Experiments (8) - Viva Espana!

Red(June 6th, 2017) Here's a new episode of Lab Times' serialised crime story. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(June 2nd, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: The evolution of household articles. more

Defying the Limits of the Visible

Red(June 1st, 2017) Viruses, proteins or subcellular structures are only possible to observe through expensive techniques that often kill or destroy the sample. But this might change as a group of scientists in Europe are pushing the boundaries of what optics has so far allowed us. more


Ongoing UK Research Problems (2) – Gagging Science

Red(May 30th, 2017) Independent of Brexit uncertainties, Jeremy Garwood reports on a number of other UK government policy changes and plans that are already changing the UK research labscape. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(May 26th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Eminem in the lab. more

Ongoing UK Research Problems (1) – Government and Science Advice

Red(May 25th, 2017) Independent of Brexit uncertainties, Jeremy Garwood reports on a number of other UK government policy changes and plans that are already changing the UK research labscape. more

Expert Help

Red(May 23rd, 2017) The European Science Foundation launched an expert services division called Science Connect last month. Lab Times got in touch with Jean-Claude Worms, the ESF Chief Executive to learn more about this division and the services they offer. more

Run the Experiments (7) - On the Run

Red(May 22nd, 2017) Here's a new episode of Lab Times' serialised crime story. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(May 19th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Something straight from the Little Shop of Horrors. more

Olfactory Uniqueness

Red(May 18th, 2017) Smell is one of our most important senses. But how does it develop? And why are some people more sensitive to certain odours? A UK research team looked into the noses of mice to find out. more

How Will you Behave?

Red(May 16th, 2017) Can plants learn, do they think ahead? Many would think these are silly questions. Not so Anthony Trewavas, who recently published a preprint on bioRxiv wondering whether plants are sentient. more

Run the Experiments (6) - Caught!

Red(May 15th, 2017) Here's a new episode of Lab Times' serialised crime story. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(May 12th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Cinematic eye poking. more

Half of People in Europe have Glyphosate Residues in their Urine

Red(May 11th, 2017) Later this year, the EU will decide about the future of Roundup in Europe. We spoke with biochemist Michael Antoniou, who together with colleagues, recently voiced concern over the use of the herbicide. more

Close your Eyes and Listen to Tumour Music

Red(May 9th, 2017) Gene expression profiles often look boring and confusing. Perhaps a little music could make data presentation and analysis all the more enjoyable. more

Run the Experiments (5)

Red(May 8th, 2017) Here's Lab Times' new serialised crime story. Episode 5: Late Night Labwork. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(May 5th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: A poetic bug. more

No to Nivolumab

Red(May 4th, 2017) Although the medical benefits of the immunotherapy drug have been proven, patients in the UK will not receive it any time soon. more

New Home for an Exciting Field

Red(May 2nd, 2017) The European Molecular Biology Laboratory is on the brink of opening a new research site dedicated to tissue biology and disease modelling in Barcelona. EMBL’s Director General, Iain Mattaj, shared details of this brand new venture with your Lab Times reporter. more


Science Fun of the Week

Red(April 28th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Best-of March for Science signs. more

Cochrane Presents Information, which can be Trusted

Red(April 27th, 2017) An interview with Britta Lang, Deputy Director of the German Cochrane Centre, about the interactions underlying one of the world’s largest medical research collaborations. more

Run the Experiments (4)

Red(April 25th, 2017) Here's Lab Times' new serialised crime story. Episode 4: Meeting the boss. more

Science Moves the World

Red(April 24th, 2017) Impressions from the March for Science in Leipzig, Germany. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(April 21st, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: A happy face in the reproductive system. more

Fabric Defence

Red(April 20th, 2017) Ticks and bedbugs are an increasing health problem worldwide. The EU-supported BETITEX project has come up with a solution: an environmentally and human-friendly textile that protects against these unwanted “guests”. more

Run the Experiments (3)

Red(April 18th, 2017) Here's Lab Times' new serialised crime story. Episode 3: A difficult situation. more

Small and Effective

Red(April 13th, 2017) Aptamers are becoming increasingly popular as therapeutics and antibody alternatives. Because of their size, they could prove valuable for neurosciences, too. more

An Unwelcome Return

Red(April 11th, 2017) The alarming rise in measles outbreaks across Europe is challenging efforts towards eliminating this contagious disease. Lab Times contacted the WHO Regional Office for Europe to understand the bare facts. more

Run the Experiments (2)

Red(April 10th, 2017) Here's Lab Times' new serialised crime story. Episode 2: Eureka! more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(April 7th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Confectionary rabbit auricular amputation. more

We Need to Increase the Public Understanding of Evolution

Red(April 6th, 2017) Last February, an extraordinary conference took place in Portugal. It was a meeting to discuss how to teach society about evolution and why this is so important. We spoke with the event's organisers about the challenges of presenting the concept of evolution to the general public. more

New Code of Conduct

Red(April 4th, 2017) In late March, the European Commission received the new European Code of Conduct for Research Integrity from Europe's national academies of sciences and humanities. more

Run the Experiments (1)

Red(April 3rd, 2017) Here's Lab Times' new serialised crime story. Episode 1: Life of a Scientist. more


Science Fun of the Week

Red(March 31st, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: A funny and sad poem by a famous geneticist. more

Life After Graduation

Red(March 30th, 2017) The European Science Foundation launched a survey to see what career paths PhDs follow after graduation. Results are expected in June this year. more

Handling Corrections and a New R-Index

Red(March 28th, 2017) While scanning through the latest manuscripts on the BioRxiv preprint server, we noticed some fresh new ideas for and observations from the academic publishing sector. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(March 24th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: The Hipster Scientist. more

The Sponge – a Lone Survivor

Red(March 24th, 2017) In Earth’s entire history, five mass extinctions have killed millions of species. In the hostile post-extinction world, one phylum has, however, managed to conquer the sea floors all over the world – the kingdom of sponges. more

More Democracy

Red(March 21st, 2017) In a recently published white paper, five scholars say that we need a new revolution in academic publishing. Scientists themselves or scientific organisations should take over paper publishing. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(March 17th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today (a bit more serious): Heavy Metal and scientific thinking. more

Inefficiency in the Editorial Office

Red(March 16th, 2017) Peer review has several weak points, one is that it can take very long. On the website SciRev.sc, researchers are able to share their experience. Jeroen Smits and Janine Huisman from Radboud University analysed the comments and revealed striking observations. more

Next in your Peer-Reviewed Magazine

Red(March 14th, 2017) More and more researchers are taking advantage of publishing their manuscripts to a preprint server, like bioRxiv. Because we think this is the future of academic publishing, we will, from now on, regularly report on the freshest ideas and findings from European labs. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(March 10th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Polynesian deities under the microscope. more

Science, not Silence

Red(March 9th, 2017) On 22nd April, a global March for Science hopes to focus attention on the pressing need to stand up for the values of science and its role in democracy. more

Good Advice

Red(March 7th, 2017) What's the best thing to do when you notice misconduct in your lab? Take immediate action. Sophie Martin at the University of Lausanne was in this very situation recently. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(March 3rd, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: The Lab Grammys. more

Dear European Governments

Red(March 2nd, 2017) Watching, slack-jawed, as democracy and scientific reason are being crushed across the pond, science organisations in Europe urge the European Commission to take action and advocate the value of science. more


Teaching a Young Dog New Tricks

Red(February 28th, 2017) Originally designed to sequence DNA and RNA, US-American scientists found a way to map cytosine and adenosine methylation with the Oxford Nanopore Technologies MinION. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(February 24th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Some exercise for the weekend! more

Humble Beginnings

Red(February 23rd, 2017) Life arises from pre-existing life. This is true, except at the very beginning, some 4.5 billion years ago. At that time, there was no life but then, extraordinary things happened. German scientists came up with a testable model of the origin of life. more

Access All Areas

Red(February 21st, 2017) Still reluctant to adopt an open science approach? Belgian researchers offer tips and good arguments. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(February 17th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today, we present to you not alternative facts but alternative definitions. more

Lessons From the Victorians

Red(February 16th, 2017) With increasing globalisation, life becomes more and more complex. It's not the first time, a society has to come to terms with information overload. An EU project investigates. more

Back in the Club

Red(February 14th, 2017) The beginning of 2017 saw Switzerland regain full access to the nearly €80 billion EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation Horizon 2020. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(February 10th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Real-Time PCR. Surreal-Time PCR?! more

Dendritic Cell Dance

Red(February 9th, 2017) A cartoon video by French cell biologist, Matthieu Piel, won the first prize at a recent science conference. He tells us more about the making of the video and the importance of science communication. more

Researchers to the Rescue

Red(February 7th, 2017) It was one of the most controversial official acts, when Donald Trump ordered a travel ban for citizens of seven countries. Supported by EMBO, scientists in Europe offer their help to stranded colleagues. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(February 34rd, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Traumatic brain injuries in Asterix comic books. more

Curiosity: The Driving Factor in Art and Science

Red(February 2nd, 2017) Ever wondered what happens when you put an artist into a lab? The artists-in-labs programme of the Zurich University of the Arts has been facilitating exactly such exchanges for the last 13 years. more


Building Bridges

Red(January 31st, 2017) Some people take their lessons from nature, some take their tools from nature. But Rebecca Schulman of Johns Hopkins University recently did both, and cracked the problem of how to build with DNA nanotubes. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(January 27th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Colourful Disease. more

Share and Care!

Red(January 26th, 2017) Do you have some leftover material from your animal experiments? Why not share it? A new database brings givers and takers closer together. more

Doing the Right Sport?

Red(January 24th, 2017) New Year, new me – people around the world take the turn of the year as a chance to get healthier and fitter. But what sport is the best to reach your goals? Football, running, or perhaps Zumba? Finnish researchers might know the answer. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(January 20th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Ten science jokes for your amusement. more

Driving Forward

Red(January 19th, 2017) Super-Mendelian inheritance is one of those terms that recently stopped being science fiction. It turned previous legislation into actual fact and made us wonder how to rule its science. This technology called “gene drivers” faced a ban from the United Nations last December. more

“Many False Claims will End up Being Considered True

Red(January 17th, 2017) In a recent article, a group of scientists lobby passionately for the publication of negative results. We spoke with first author, Silas Boye Nissen. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(January 13th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Does it Fart? more

Science Forecasts

Red(January 12th, 2017) What's in store for science in 2017? Hans Clevers, Francis Levi and George Church look into the crystall ball and make their predictions. more

Happy Birthday, ERC!

Red(January 10th, 2017) This year, the European Research Council turns ten. Started as a pioneering experiment back in 2007, it has since become a genuine success story. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(January 6th, 2017) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Sex differences in idiotic behaviour. more

Welcome to our World

Red(January 4th, 2017) Just when you thought, all the world's animals, plants and fungi have been discovered, new species pop up in unusual places - on Facebook, the deep sea and even in Europe. Here's our selection of newly-described species. more


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